Category Archives: kale

Massaged Kale Salad

  • 10 oz. kale (Dino kale works best)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon or a pinch of salt
  • 1/4 cup crumbled blue cheese or feta
  • 2 tablespoons minced red onion
  • 2 tablespoons chopped toasted pecans or walnuts
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp. balsamic glaze
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries (optional)
  • 1 cup fresh orange segments or canned mandarins (optional)

Remove and discard the stems from the kale. Chop the leaves into bite-sized pieces. Place in a large mixing bowl with 1/8 teaspoon salt and the olive oil. Grab the leaves by the handful and massage them for a minute or two. The coarse, stiff leaves will turn soft and smooth. You will end up with about half the volume of kale you started with.

Add the fruit, cheese, onion and nuts  Stir well to combine. Drizzle the balsamic glaze over the salad and stir to coat.

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BAKED KALE CHIPS

Ingredients
1 head kale, washed and thoroughly dried
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
Sea salt, for sprinkling
Optional: add 1 tsp of any spice you like. Garlic, lemon pepper, etc.

Directions
Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Remove leaves from the ribs and tear into bite sized pieces. Allow to dry or chips may come out chewy. In a bowl toss kale with olive oil and salt. Lay on a baking sheet and add additional seasoning if desired. Bake until crisp – approximately 15 – 20 minutes.

WHY GREENS ARE SO GOOD FOR YOU

Did you know that 100 calories of kale has more protein than 100 calories of beef? That’s right! Dark green leafy vegetables are, calorie for calorie, the most concentrated source of nutrition of any food. They are a rich source of minerals (including iron, calcium, potassium, and magnesium) and vitamins, including vitamins K, C, E, and many of the B vitamins. They also provide a variety of phytonutrients, which protect our cells from damage and our eyes from age-related problems. Dark green leaves are an excellent source of omega-3s (a good fat). Examples of some dark leafy greens are : arugula, kale, chard, cabbage and broccoli.

FUN FACT: Most people think of salmon as a great source of omega-3s, but salmon themselves don’t actually produce omega-3. They get it from what they eat, which includes smaller oily feeder fish that eat omega-3-rich algae. Algae, not salmon, is the original source of omega-3s.